Contact: Joe Ullrich
877-227-2601
joeullrich@omnipublicity.com
For Immediate Release
June 15, 2005

Subliminal Ads Pop Up on Sci-Fi Channel

Attorney August Bullock reveals that briefly displayed subliminal advertisements sometimes appear on satellite TV sci-fi programs

About The Author:
August Bullock is an attorney and former law professor who has been involved in the subliminal controversy since the late 1970s. He is an experienced professional speaker who has appeared on many radio and television shows across the country. The author of a controversial "underground" textbook entitled, The Secret Sales Pitch: An Overview of Subliminal Advertising (2004), he often teaches seminars to members of the advertising community explaining how to use subliminal techniques. He is the creator of Subliminal Sex T-shirts ™, which endow the wearer with mysterious powers and became the best selling item in Macy's department stores.

Availability:

August Bullock is available for interviews nationwide by arrangement and via telephone or satellite. He is also available as a last-minute guest. For more information please contact:
Joe Ullrich
Omni Publicity And Public Relations Group
877-227-2601

The next time you turn on your satellite Sci-Fi channel, you might ponder whether you are watching the Twilight Zone -- or part of it­.

According to attorney August Bullock, subliminally flashed advertisements are sometimes inserted between the regular commercials and the shows. The subliminal ads are ordinary ads, promoting everyday items like cleaning products, computers, and eczema cream. What’s unusual about them is that they only appear for a fraction of a second - far too fast to be seen consciously.

Bullock is the author of The Secret Sales Pitch: An Overview of Subliminal Advertising (ISBN No.0-9742640-0-8), an “underground” textbook which argues that subliminals have long been used in media. The flashed subliminal ads were discovered by a reader who had taped the Sci-Fi shows and was editing out the commercials for future viewing.

In the 1950s, an advertising psychologist named James Vicary claimed movie goers headed to the refreshment stand in droves after being subliminally exposed to the commands “Hungry? Eat Popcorn” and “Drink Coca Cola.” Although he was later discredited, the controversy over subliminal advertising persists to the present day. In a study published in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology in 2002, high school students were subliminally exposed to pictures of a Coca-Cola® can and the word “thirsty” while watching an episode of the television show The Simpsons. The students reported feeling almost twice as thirsty as members of a control group, although they had no idea fleeting images were embedded in the program.

Flashed subliminal ads were used openly in the fifties, until a public uproar caused the networks to vow never to employ them. They were later banned by the FCC. Bullock speculates the Satellite companies might feel the FCC regulations don’t apply to them because their broadcasting systems are private. Specific examples of the flash frames and a DVD of the shows are available at his website at SubliminalSex.com. (Click on Sci-Fi Subliminals.)

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